Terri’s May Blog

The “OCD” Overthinking Mind

 

My personal focus as an author, speaker, and coach is on mental health and wellness. I help people to quiet their overthinking mind and build their emotional muscle. I have learned and experienced first hand that a trained mind can help to quiet an overthinking mind. I have also learned that the overthinking mind of someone who lives with mental illness is not the same as the overthinking mind of someone who does not, but that ultimately both can be trained. The difference is that people with mental illness require a much greater support system and more varied approaches, which sometimes include medication, as well as deeper trainings such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). Read more

Terri’s March Blog

The Cost of Being Too Busy

 

How often do you use the word “busy” to describe the state of your life? It seems like it’s really in fashion these days to be busy.

 

Although busy is defined as having a great deal to do, I get the feeling that we all experience “being busy” in very different ways: Read more

Terri’s January Blog

 

Parenting—Then & Now

 

Parenthood is one of the greatest gifts. Becoming a parent three times offered me my three greatest blessings. Taking on the role of mother felt right, natural, and beautiful. I felt loved, appreciated, and needed. And then…things changed.

 

The kids grew up, technology advanced, devices of all kinds emerged, and I chose not to board the technological bandwagon. At the time, I had no idea of the long-term consequences of that decision. Over time, however, I noticed my frustration increasing, the generation gap widening, and my role as parent—clearly shifting. Read more

Terri’s December Blog

 

Powerful Questions for the New Year

 

When you make mental wellness a priority—you lay the foundation for a beautiful life. An important statement, no doubt, but what does it mean to you?

 

My greatest teaching from the field of coaching is the importance of a powerful question. Every powerful question, meaning one that makes you think in a new way, has the capacity to open a new door within the mind, even if only ever so slightly. But there’s always a choice: You can shut it down if it feels too uncomfortable and choose not to go there OR you can choose to get curious, invite it in, and somehow embrace the discomfort knowing full well that this is how we grow. Read more

Terri’s November Blog

Intentional Living: Generating Emotions Ahead of Time

 

How are you is a question that is frequently asked by rote and usually responded to in the same manner. Generally, we respond using one of the following well-known phrases: I’m good, I’m fine, OK, still alive, hanging in there, can’t complain… Our emotional vocabulary may not feel so limited—but it is.

 

Most people would not respond by saying, “I’m amazing, loving life, never been better!” This has everything to do with our conditioning and lifestyle habits. Clearly, responding from a place of neutrality and/or pessimism has become a default habit. Read more

Terri’s October Blog

 

A New Kind of Partnership

 

It greets me first every morning

And also tucks me into bed

It’s my constant companion

The voice within my head Read more

Terri’s September Blog

Which is the Bigger Bully?

 

A poem to ponder:

 

I’m feeling lonely and tired

Tired of being teased and bullied—by life

 

Life teases and taunts me, daily

Playing with my overthinking mind Read more

Terri’s August Blog

 

Goodbye Should; Hello Must

 

What I should have done this summer:

I should have invested in…

 

  • Updating my website (launched in 2014)
  • Developing better branding and business marketing strategies
  • Expanding upon my pre-existing wellness curriculum
  • Creating new PowerPoints to support that new curriculum
  • Networking on Linked-In & building my social media presence
  • Building my subscriber list & coaching clientele
  • Securing future speaking engagements
  • Connecting with people on Facebook

Read more

Terri’s July Blog

Sympathetic Joy

 

Buddhist wisdom has expanded my understanding of both suffering and joy. My intention today is to focus on the joy—more specifically on one particular state of mind known as “sympathetic joy.”

 

Buddhism teaches that there are four inner states where it is most valuable to reside: loving-kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy, and equanimity. These have been referred to as the four immesasurables because they have no limit. Read more

Terri’s June Blog

Making Peace With My Pain at 50:

 

I consider every birthday to be a cause for celebration and most to be a time for healthy reflection. By that I mean, it’s a good time to review the past and to set goals for the future while at the same time not attaching to any particular outcome. One very important lesson that I’ve learned over the years is that while having a bigger vision and smaller goals are essential, the pressure-filled timeline that usually goes along with them is definitely not.

 

We cannot possibly control all of the circumstances of our lives. Life is ultimately a co-creation and an unfolding. Of course over the years I’ve had many different visions for my future, some which I have manifested while others I have not. Yet, all things considered, I do my best to acknowledge and celebrate the successes and learn from the rest. I encourage my students and clients to do the same and to consider their “non-successes” not as failures, but rather as teachings that become opportunities for course correction and personal growth. Read more